Is D&D Demonic, revisited (VIDEO)

A few days ago I uploaded a sort of “tongue in cheek” video tackling the age old question, “Is Dungeons and Dragons demonic?” That video prompted quite a bit of commentary on some of the D&D sub-reddits. I thought some of the commentary was quite thoughtful, which caused me to reflect a bit on the original video.

The result was a “part 2” video which I just uploaded this morning.

Is D&D Demonic
Image via YouTube screengrab

I hope you all enjoy this approach as well and tangentially, it sort of occured to me that this might be a great lead-in question to have a conversation using “street epistemology.”

For those unfamiliar with the term, street epistemology is a “dialectical approach intent on helping people reflect on the reliability of the methods used to arrive at deeply-held beliefs.”

In other words, while in the process of explaining what D&D is so that ones fears are assuaged, you can probe what gives your interlocutor confidence that demons are actually real! Pretty cool huh?

So even though these two videos are a part of my Dungeons and Dragons playlists, they are also the first of a new series of videos I’m cataloguing under the playlist: Critical Thinking. Something for which we seem to be in very short supply!

I’ve built my Twitter following more or less under the umbrella of tackling irrational ideas, so hopefully this cross-pollination will grow some pretty cool fruit.

I hope you enjoy it! And please subscribe to my channel if you haven’t already!

Is Dungeons and Dragons Demonic? (VIDEO)

I started playing Dungeons and Dragons when I was in middle school way back in the early 1980s. I was also a regular attendee at Piney Grove Baptist Church; which at the time was a cute little “fire and brimstone” Southern Baptist church in Cobb County, Georgia.

Turns out, that in addition to “rock and roll” and beer, playing D&D was somewhat frowned upon back then (and from what I’ve gathered from many of the comments you sent me in response to my video, it’s still occasionally frowned upon).

But why? Why would a fun, role-playing game like D&D end up in the cross-hairs of religious fanatics? Answer: they thought (and think) it’s “demonic” or “satanic.”

And believe it or not, I still get asked this question from time to time. So I thought I’d spend a few minutes explaining why Dungeons and Dragons is NOT demonic.

First, I’m not even sure what “demonic” actually means. I know that demons are fictional creatures, but I’m not sure what someone means when they call something else, “demonic.” For the purposes of this post, let’s just assume that “demonic” means some kind of bizarre devil worship.

Secondly and most importantly, the reason why Dungeons and Dragons is not demonic, is because there are no such things as demons!

Demons, like devils, gods, goblins, werewolves, vampires, and leprechauns, are creations of human imaginations. They have been drawn, written about, painted, and named, but they have never, ever been detected by anyone, anywhere at anytime. Zip.

So we can confidently say that in the absence of any evidence whatsoever that any of the aforementioned imaginary creatures are actually real, we can accept them for what they are: characters in stories.

Now, go play Dungeons and Dragons and have fun the way <insert your preferred deity> intended. 😉